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1. BEATLES - Abbey Road (50th Anniversary)
2. BON IVER - i,i
3. SANDRO PERRI - Soft Landing 
4. RHEOSTATICS - Here Come The Wolves
5. JOAN SHELLEY - Like The River Loves The Sea

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FEATURED RELEASES

Wednesday
Oct022019

VARIOUS - World Spirituality Classics 2: The Time For Peace Is Now

"The Time For Peace Is Now compiles fourteen songs that, while recorded over four decades ago, speak now more than ever. The tracks are a subset of 1970s-era gospel, not directly talking about Jesus or God, but instead tackling how we live with ourselves and each other. These are undeniably soulful, passionate, and urgent songs from obscure 45s, dug up from a long dormancy in attics, sheds and rated across the American south. Compiled by Gospel guru Greg Belson.

The Gospel bands heard on The Time For Peace Is Now were comprised of musicians who played both church and secular music. The church borrowed—or rather commandeered—the guitar, bass, drums, and other instruments used to backup Motown, Stax, and other popular labels—to give power to the songs they supported. Musicians who sang at ‘the club’ on Saturday night were often leading solos or singing in the choir on Sunday mornings. Saturday night and Sunday morning music began to interweave, which was especially felt when the church choirs sang Gospel. It was Gospel’s in uence that made Aretha Franklin, Sam Cooke, and many others the voice of the 1960s and 1970s. Gospel was the soul of America.

This album is reflective of the dichotomy of the sacred and the secular. The music here is in some sense the same as the music of the club. “Keep Your Faith To The Sky” could have you singing “Keep Your Head To The Sky” by Earth, Wind and Fire. Listening to “It’s Hard To Live In This Old World” and “That’s A Sign Of The Times” imbues the pessimistic/realistic sense of what was happening. Like many Blues songs, the problem must rst be named before it can be solved. At the end of The Time For Peace Is Now, hope is still present. The problem is named in the beginning and a possible solution is presented." Luaka Bop

Tuesday
Oct012019

DAVID KILGOUR - Bobbie's A Girl

"I got swept away by it, to be honest.

I turned it up loud and let the warmth of it flow all around me – and it transported me to a place I didn't even know I wanted to go.

Something about that loose tangle of electric and acoustic guitars, the swinging heft of the bass, those distant constellations of piano notes, the subtle smack of drums, slightly behind the beat.

When it got to the end, I didn't want to break the spell, so I just had to play the whole damn thing all over again." Stuff

Thursday
Aug082019

ARETHA FRANKLIN - Amazing Grace (DVD)

"In Aretha Franklin’s revelatory concert film Amazing Grace, she barely speaks a word. Aside from one muffled request for water and a hushed discussion with her musical director, there’s not a peep out of her. Instead, she focuses her concentration wholly on the spirit of the gospel music she came to perform during the film’s historic two-day shoot, which took place in January 1972 at the New Temple Baptist Mission church in Los Angeles. “She came for a church service,” the late singer’s niece Sabrina Owens, who controls the estate, said to the Guardian. “The way she conducted herself was totally different than what you would see at one of her pop concerts. Her eyes were closed. Her head was thrown back. She was focused entirely on something higher.

To witness the whiplash contrast between that self-effacement, and the star power of her vocal performance, is just one element which greatly distinguishes watching the Amazing Grace film from listening to the album of the same name, which came out late in 1972. That double-set became Franklin’s biggest-selling album, as well as the top-grossing gospel collection of all time. Meanwhile, the film lay uncompleted in the vaults for another 38 years, hobbled by gobsmacking mistakes, poor planning and, eventually, by Franklin’s health issues. After a complex, fraught and dragged-out series of events, the movie was finally completed by the producer Alan Elliott last fall..." - The Guardian

Saturday
Aug032019

JAMES & BOBBY PURIFY - I'm Your Puppet: The Complete BELL Recordings 1966-69

"The complete works of this incredible 60s soul duo – a 2CD package that features both their albums for the Bell Records label, lots of contemporaneous 45s, and even some unreleased tracks too! James & Bobby Purify followed in a tradition that was strongly started by Sam & Dave – the two-male soul duo, with both voices coming in on the lead, breaking apart as the tracks progressed, and crossing back and forth, for a fuller sound that often made for a more dynamic approach than with a single singer! James & Bobby had a wonderful sound – slower and deeper than Sam & Dave, with plenty of touches of southern soul, and a tendency to use a nice heavy beat, even in their mellower tracks – which really makes this work burn with a deep soul intensity. The 2CD set features 38 tracks in all – the full titles from the albums James & Bobby Purify and Pure Sound Of The Purifys, plus singles, unreleased tracks, and more..." - Dusty Groove

Saturday
Jul202019

BRIAN ENO - Apollo: Atmospheres & Soundtracks (Extended Edition)

"In honor of the 50th anniversary of Apollo 11's moon landing, Brian Eno's classic 1983 album has been re-mastered and re-released with an additional whole album of new music. Featuring co-producer and ethereal guitarist Daniel Lanois and pianist Roger Eno (younger brother of Brian), the album has withstood the test of time and remains one of ambient music's most influential releases.       

Apollo's compositions are well-developed and surprisingly lively considering the artist's propensity to create supremely tranquil soundscapes. The liveliness is courtesy of brother Roger's chamber-like keyboards and Lanois' richly layered guitar tones. Make no mistake though; Apollo has plenty of the shadowy and textural sonic soundscapes that rendered Eno the Godfather of ambient...

The space-themed song titles on disc two more than hint at the music that lies within and could act as descriptions; "The End of a Thin Cord," "Under the Moon," "Strange Quiet," "Clear Desert Night," and "Last Step From the Surface" are the best examples. Following in the footsteps of disc one, the trio show off their creative ambitions with slowly shifting waves of meditative, hypnotic, and majestic harmonies and even an occasional melody. The enchanting instrumental pieces never stray too far into the nebulous stratosphere and are well worth the price of admission." - Under The Radar

Wednesday
Jul102019

STELLA DONNELLY - Beware Of The Dogs

"'It's never too late to be on time.' If there's one message to take away from Beware of the Dogs, it's this, because when Stella Donnelly calls you out — and she is calling most of you out — it's not so much finger-pointing as it is a wake-up call. Her debut is a striking proclamation that holds the powers that be accountable for misbehaviours on all fronts. Unlike last year's Thrush Metal, the Perth artist has expanded her arsenal and now stands at the helm of a full band. The simple addition of synths, cello, bass, piano and (most notably) percussion, has elevated her music to a place most of us were hoping she would — one that's sonically diverse and a little more multidimensional.
 
Instrumentally, there's a flare and excitement that was lacking on previous work. Each song is unique, rarely applying the same formula twice. Fortunately, she's ensured every musical choice, structural or instrumental, serves a purpose. When her message is best told intimately, she restricts everything else until it's needed. And despite the emotional weight a lot of these songs carry, most are quite upbeat — even fun. Her vocals are also more daring on this record. Breeze-like melodies cruise through multiple octaves with ease, fluttering with vibrato at the tail end of her notes. Sometimes she'll even drop them off early, pairing the attitude in her words with impatience in her tone..." - Exclaim

Wednesday
Jun052019

KEVIN MORBY - Oh My God

"It takes seconds for Kevin Morby to set the mood for Oh My God: piano roll, hushed melody and harmonized chorus, the sum of which induces a spellbound attention for the rest of the album. This is Morby's secular gospel album, a record envisioned and recorded aloft in planes, awake in beds and indefinitely on the road, with Morby, in rapturous disbelief, muttering "Oh my god" at his fortune all the while.
 
Not a single cut on Oh My God feels out of place. Each song is effulgent in its composition and intention, from the hymnal boogie "OMG Rock n Roll," to the wholly intimate "Seven Devils" to the bashful and bluesy "Ballad Of Faye." Despite always feeling full and fleshed-out, Oh My God is comparatively and intentionally sparse when held up Morby's earlier albums...
 
...To decree a record as an artist's "epic" is always a paradoxical accomplishment, suggesting heights that may never be reached again, and casting past works, great though they may be, into a comparative pale. But it's hard not to be awed by a record that has you saying its name to simply describe it." - Exclaim

Wednesday
Jun052019

MARI SAMUELSEN - MARI

"Norwegian violinist Mari Samuelsen’s debut for the Yellow Label is entitled simply MARI, and is set for international release on 7 June 2019. Recorded with the Konzerthausorchester Berlin and conductor Jonathan Stockhammer, the album explores the contradictions of contemporary life – the fact that, despite the excitement of city life and the convenience of instant communication and express travel, many of us still feel a need to ground ourselves in the peace and quiet of the natural world. Mari herself was born in rural Norway and goes back to the family farm as often as her schedule allows. She was keen, therefore, to choose a selection of music echoing the conflicting pulls on our time and energy.

At the emotional heart of the album is Bach’s Chaconne in D minor, whose serenity Samuelsen has chosen to counter with the nervous agitation of “Knee Play 2” from Philip Glass’s Einstein on the Beach. The rest of the programme of her DG debut grew organically from the seeds of Bach and Glass, tracing themes of change and renewal, from the increasingly complex variations of the Chaconne to the expansive melodic development of Clark’s Mammal Step Sequence. The album also combines familiar repertoire with brand-new pieces from some of today’s leading composers and musicians.

Mari tested different combinations of compositions, carefully considering the ways in which they related to one another and to the whole. The finished recording contains pieces as diverse as Vladimir Martynov’s The Beatitudes, Peter Gregson’s Sequence (Four), arrangements of Jóhann Jóhannsson’s Heptapod B and Brian Eno’s song By this River, and Pēteris Vasks’ Vientulais Engelis (“Lonely Angel”). The mix also includes four works by Max Richter, with whom she collaborates on a regular basis, including Vocal, for solo violin, and the wonderfully hypnotic November." - Deutsche Grammophone

Tuesday
Apr162019

VARIOUS - Floating Points: Late Night Tales

"I once heard Floating Points DJ in bright sunshine and was disappointed: he played a forgettable mix of funk and disco that bore little resemblance to his production work. His best music is masterfully paced, transitioning effortlessly between the calm and the cacophonous, and it's better suited to a patient listener than a raucous crowd. This sets him up perfectly for a Late Night Tales mix: the solitary, nocturnal headphones-wearer has always been the series' target audience, and beneath the night sky’s warm blanket, FloPo—real name Sam Shepherd—feels at ease, crafting a soothing, drifting set that feels intimately connected with its listener.

...Many of Shepherd’s choices are the product of hours spent listening to music, a penchant for the obscure which is to be applauded, but the true art of DJing, as Shepherd exhibits here, lies in making connections between records—not based on genre or bpm, but because together they create the desired mood, tell a particular story, paint a certain picture; whatever the metaphor, it’s a skill not just in playing music, but in listening to it.

Listening to music is why we’re all here, at a time when such a practice is in a state of change. If you, like many of us, can’t be bothered deciding what to listen to, you could do a lot worse than letting Shepherd choose for you. His LNT is a soothing, calming mix for music lovers and night owls, with a human touch that’s impossible to replicate." - XLR8R

Tuesday
Apr162019

VARIOUS - Spiritual Jazz Vol.9: Blue Notes

"The Blue Note Record label needs little introduction. Musically, graphically and sonically iconic, the label created and defined the golden age of modern jazz on record. Founded in 1939 by German émigré Alfred Lion, the label's roster of artists is a litany of giants -- Thelonious MonkSonny Rollins, Horace Silver, Lee Morgan, Art Blakey, Lee Morgan, Herbie Hancock, and many more. With peerless musicians in the grooves, the legendary Rudy Van Gelder behind the boards, and graphic design genius Reid Miles creating emblematic artwork for every release, Blue Note -- "the Cadillac of the jazz lines" -- was outstanding in every way. 

Volume 9 of Jazzman's ground-breaking Spiritual Jazz series takes a close look at the deeper side of Blue Note -- from the experimental avant-garde explored by younger musicians such as Bobby Hutcherson, Joe Henderson, and Pete La Roca, to the exciting new developments in modal sounds put forward by stalwarts Hank Mobley, Jackie McLean, and Duke Pearson. The music we have selected shows how musicians working with the label responded to a period of dramatic social and sonic change, charting the route toward the esoteric and spiritualized sounds that would dominate the deepest jazz of the 1970s. As ever, Blue Note had lit the path, and this new Spiritual Jazz collection shows that the progressive and underground jazz sound of the 1960s was not only the preserve of obscure artists and private pressings. Blue spirits and heavy sounds on Blue Note -- the finest in jazz since 1939, brought to you by Jazzman." - Forced Exposure

Tuesday
Apr162019

TOM ZE - Estudando O Samba

"Incredibly unique concept album from the one and only, Tom Zé. As featured in Rolling Stone magazine's 100 Greatest Brazilian Albums of all-time list (2007). One of Ze’s finest albums in our opinion, originally released by Continental Brazil in 1976 – a tough one to find at a good price in its original form now.

‘Estudando do Samba’ (or ‘Studying The Samba’) is a post-Tropicalia studio experimentation laiden with layers of hypnotic percussion, effects & samples that deconstructs the ‘samba’ form. Recorded during what was arguably his most creative period. David Byrne found the record in Rio in the late 90’s and included several songs on his Tom Ze collection for Luaka Bop a few years later. At that time Tom was not recording or touring much; playing low-key shows in Sao Paulo and contemplating a move back to Irará to work at a service station owned by one of his cousins. Byrne’s project helped to reignite his career and he hasn’t looked back since." - Mr. Bongo

Tuesday
Apr162019

MARTIN FRAWLEY - Undone At 31

"...Poor Martin Frawley. He broke up with his long-time girlfriend, Jules MacFarlane, after eight years, which also put him out of a job, since the two of them founded and co-led the angsty, jangly Melbourne band Twerps. He’s also evidently broken the 3-0 barrier, a classic, nearly stereotypical age for soul-searching, progress-measuring and feelings of inadequacy in any business, let alone one as exposed and emotionally on display as songwriting. But good news, Frawley has made lemonade, squeezing out the sour juices of life into a lovely, acid-tipped, unassuming but quite refreshing solo record, Undone at 31.  

The disc is spare and intimate, the words like a conversation, the music subtle and mostly acoustic, guitar, piano, a few synths, bass and drums. Frawley is backed by Stewart Bronaugh, a sometime member of Angel Olsen’s band who plays in Lionlimb with Joshua Jaeger, as well as Angus Lord from Twerps on bass and Matt Harkin (of the Stephens) on drums...And yet it feels like it’s mostly him alone, sitting in a room, working things out in song and drink.Undone at 31 is a charmingly bare, personal album that transmutes personal upheaval into unaffected art. Let’s hope Frawley doesn’t have to write another like this any time soon, but we can enjoy the one we have." - Dusted

Tuesday
Mar192019

SIMON GHRAICHY - 33

"The first thing that strikes you about this album is the colorful sound Simon Ghraichy brings out from the instrument. This is also due to the unique timbre of the piano and the relatively close recording. The album starts with a lovely transcription by the pianist, followed by uniquely programmed set of pieces and composers, the center of which is Schumann’s “Humoreske” and “Etudes In Variation Form on a Theme By Beethoven” (based on the second movement of the Seventh Symphony).

Schumann also stands in the center of the album conceptually, with pieces such as Chilly Gonzales’ “Robert on the bridge”, a commissioned piece, with Gonzales joining in. Other connections emerge, such as the latin-sounding “Passionato” movement in the variations, resembling the short Ramirez transcription heard earlier (track 3) or the almost circular opening of the Humoreske, echoed later in the minimalist music of Philip Glass and Michael Nyman..." - The Classic Review

Tuesday
Mar192019

ROBERT FORSTER - Inferno

"...There is a surprise from the very start: loosely adapted from the WB Yeats poem Crazy Jane Talks with the Bishop, Crazy Jane on the Day of Judgment is so leisurely in its intent that it’s in danger of slipping by unnoticed. The song’s two-chord groove and piano lines, however, leads you into lyrics that contemplate the passing of time, and the eagerness of the spirit blighted by the weakness of the flesh. No Fame pivots on ego and artistic privilege (“some people rise while others are happy to fall – I don’t need no fame”), while Inferno (Brisbane in Summer) leaps at you with a Velvet Underground drone-beat and a Television-like guitar lick...

...Pensive, less fractious autobiography continues in slower but just as outstanding songs. “It’s a new day, another night that I’ve survived,” 61-year-old Forster sings in The Morning. Life Has Turned a Page, meanwhile, is an affable sketch of someone else’s life, its twists and turns underpinned by unassuming melodic shuffles.

For an album that lasts a mere 35 minutes, a lot is packed into it – a few generations' worth, in fact. Aligning the confessional lyrics with music that is shrewdly textured (is that a xylophone we hear somewhere?) and nonchalantly performed, Forster achieves what is, to date, a personal best." - Irish Times

Tuesday
Mar192019

MASAKATSU TAKAGI - Marginalia

"Each track is associated with a number. #1 is a very breezy country stroll full of subtle rolls and gleeful flutters. Its unrushed approach sets the tone that #2 absolutely nails in its hushed and muted jazzy undertones. What stands out for me though is the warmth you get in a melancholy whimsy slice of life movie or anime that only Asian cinema seems to give proper sentiment to these days. #5 moves things into a floating shimmering watery world where the higher keys roll off like a butterfly wing having their own song whilst the rest of the piece plays underneath. It’s beautifully done and sounds like Takagi has four hands rather than two – a stand out for sure...

...‘Marginalia’ is such an interesting collection of piano pieces because there is an innate slow burn to almost all 13 tracks, yet they all come with their own twist on it. They either fuse with natures own soundtrack or with voices of the countryside and often it mixes that slow warm with something full of wisdom and eerie charm. Fans of Ryuichi Sakamoto will love this, but so may fans of Philip Glass too." - Higher Plain Music

Tuesday
Mar192019

STEVE GUNN - The Unseen In Between

"While Gunn’s work often touches on themes of discovery and wander, his new LP repositions him in a manner allowing him the chance to confront and reflect what he’s been searching for. Within its nine tracks, Gunn addresses matters of death, acceptance, and expectations, all of which round his music with serenity and credence, thus positioning him on the forefront not only as a quintessential narrator for our time, but a faithful guide who gently directs us revitalized and untroubled.

Within our arduous journey to seize a voice that has the ability to stabilize us is a feat all in itself. We seek those who resonate with relatability and depth; we also desire safeguards to hold close as intimate keepsakes through our own personal mania as we attempt to acquire that asylum for ourselves. Gunn’s music and perspective in every such way offers the ability to cure us from those demons and uncertainty. In his composed, unfeigned demeanor from his attributed folk-rock styling to his ability to capture a story, Unseen... serves as an exemplary marker allowing us the needed opportunity to exhale..." - The Line Of Best Fit

Saturday
Feb162019

ANEMONE - Beat My Distance

"Following last year’s terrific Baby Only You & I EP, Montreal singer-songwriter Chloé Soldevila is back with Anemone‘s debut album. It’s a nice mix of styles that manages to pull from different eras and genres — ’60s sunshine pop and yé-yé, krautrock, ’90s Madchester — into a sound that is distinctively theirs and, as Chloé puts it, captures “the feeling of driving endlessly on a sunny day with a lover, the feeling of dancing and forgetting about everything while feeling high on life.” Beat My Distance is an exceedingly charming debut album, filled to the brim with memorable melodies and great arrangements.

The album’s also a real showcase for the rhythm section, featuring  loose, Can-influenced drumming that’s recorded in an appealingly flat, Al Green style, and the kind of groovy basslines you might hear on Serge Gainsbourg or Scott Walker records. There’s also lots of old farfisa organs and junkshop keyboards, stylophone, sitar and other lightly psychedelic touches, all of which aid and support Soldevila’s wonderfully catchy songs. Musically, they’re unflaggingly upbeat but never saccharine, though lyrically it’s more of a breakup-and-moving-on record, and nearly every song could be a single. (This album also gets better on repeat listens.) I do wish there was a little more of the band’s funky side that reared its head on the EP, but we do get the fantastic “Endless Drive” (see her description of Anemone’s sound) that starts as a ballad, heads to the tropics and then goes into overdrive thanks to hyperactive vintage drum machine and layer upon layer of warm psychedelic touches. It’s the sound of pure bliss." - Brooklyn Vegan

Saturday
Feb162019

VARIOUS - This Is Lowrider Soul 1962-1970

"The Mexican, Central and South American immigrants who settled around east Los Angeles have long had an affinity for soul love ballads (aka slow jams). In recent times the scene they and their descendants initiated has intensified and spread to soul fans and collectors around the world, especially those already sympathetic to the music and intrigued by titles that were finding favour among the hip lowrider set.

The lowrider tag comes from the love of classic US automobiles which members of the scene customise to cruise the city streets. Sean Hampsey – DJ, promoter and owner of the UK’s Diggin’ Deep soul label – has teamed up with lowrider authority Ruben Molina to create Kent’s tribute to this style of music. In addition to writing The Old Barrio Guide To Lowrider Music, Ruben works with colleagues Arlene and Josh in the Southern Soul Spinners DJ team around their Southern California heartland. The SSS have also contributed titles and spirit to this compilation.

Spanning the years 1962 to 1970, the music here moves from the doo wop sound of the Vows to sweet soul harmony ballads such as the Four Tees’ ‘One More Chance’. Lowrider classics are provided by the Whispers, Barbara Mason, the Ambassadors, Brenton Wood and Lee Williams & the Cymbals, most of which are already quite well known in Europe. Brenton Wood in particular has an amazing knack of producing just the right type of music for the lowrider scene." - Ace Records

Saturday
Feb162019

BUSINESS OF DREAMS - Ripe For Anarchy

"..."Ripe For Anarchy" is a through-and-through ode to indie pop, in the historic definition of the genre. "My Old Town" and "N.R.E.A.M." could be album cuts on a Grant McLennan solo album, "Don’t Let Our Time Expire" and "Naive Scenes" could be The Smiths, the Sparklehorse cover "The Hatchet Song" bears an uncanny resemblance to Australian pop pioneers Even As We Speak, and "I Feel Dread" has the unmistakable earmarks of The Field Mice.

The deeper influences, however, are far more abstract. "I got really into FM keyboards and sampling for this album. The idea of making an album with indie pop songs filtered through late 80’s studio production was intriguing", Cunningham says. "I was listening to a lot of Ryuichi Sakamoto and Comsat Angels".

And while he may be more noted for playing guitar in chainsaw-pop stalwarts Terry Malts, New Zealand-worshipping Smokescreens, and Merge Record’s garage rock hero Mike Krol’s backing band, Cunningham is most at home making soft sounds extolling the wounded and dour. "I think music is the most personal of mediums. You can work and listen, you can run and listen, you can drive and listen. And I think I’m a misfit. If I can make the most personal music for misfits, then I’m satisfied". - Slumberland

Saturday
Feb022019

VARIOUS - Soul Of A Nation 2: Jazz Is The Teacher, Funk Is The Preacher

"Soul Jazz Records’ new release ‘Soul of A Nation: Jazz is the Teacher, Funk is the Preacher’ is a powerful new collection of radical jazz, street funk and proto-rap made in the era of Black Power (1969-75).

This new album features a number of important and ground-breaking African-American artists – The Art Ensemble of Chicago, Don Cherry, Funkadelic, Gil Scott-Heron and more – alongside a host of lesser-known artists all of whom in the early 1970s were exploring new Afrocentric poly-rhythmical styles of music – radical jazz, street funk and proto-rap – while at the same time exploring the Black Power and civil-rights inspired notions of self-definition, self-respect and self-empowerment in their own lives.

During this era African-American jazz musicians ripped up traditional definitions – rejecting the term ‘entertainer’ to redefine themselves instead as ‘artists’. They worked outside of the mainstream music industry perceiving this artistic relationship to be fundamentally exploitative and politically flawed. Artists instead formed their own pan-arts community-centric collectives, set up their own record labels, ran concerts in alternative performance spaces – art galleries, parks, lofts, community centres – all as a way of taking control of their own creative destinies...Their music developed into a radical and intense Afrocentric mix of jazz, funk, soul and street poetry, all in search of a new musical language that could better represent artistic African-American cultural expression.

All of the featured artists here were involved in this search in different ways; A shared sense of Afrocentric collectivism joined the dots between the deep avant-garde experimentalism of The Art Ensemble of Chicago (here featuring soul singer Fontella Bass singing the powerful ‘Theme de Yoyo’) to the hyper funk psychedelia of George Clinton’s Funkadelic.

The poetry of Gil Scott-Heron and Sarah Webster Fabio performed with a backdrop of street funk and heavyweight percussion laid down the template for the birth of rap. The Har-You Percussion Group, a group of young Harlem teenagers, showed how government-sponsored social initiatives helped create great art and music. Gary Bartz and The Oneness of Juju offer spirituality and cosmology. Collectives like The Pharaohs and Detroit’s Tribe add deep jazz and street funk in equal measures. And so on.

Influenced and radicalised by Black Power and civil rights, all these artists were involved in creating – in the words of the Art Ensemble of Chicago – ‘Great Black Music: Ancient to Future.’" -Soul Jazz Records